I was born and raised in Kansas and learned to cook alongside my mother. Now, along with my wonderful husband, I have taken the plunge into the city life in New York. These are my food adventures: in my own tiny kitchen, and in the many restaurants of the city.

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Spring Garlic Pesto Pasta

The warm weather arriving in New York is like the city opening its doors and saying "come on in." We can finally leave the confines of our tiny apartments without fear of snow and cold beating us down and we take to the streets to rejoice.

As I've wandered the city over the past few weeks it's felt like coming home again. I remember all that is on offer here and rush to soak it up. And this time around my camera is usually slung by my side, waiting to grab little pieces of the city that capture my heart.







Spring Garlic Pesto Pasta
The warm weather also offers up a fresh bounty at the markets. Here's one way to take advantage.

6 stems spring green garlic
1/4 c. Parmesan cheese, shredded
1/3 c. walnuts
1/4 t. salt
1/8 t. pepper
1/2-3/4 c. extra virgin olive oil

1 lb. pasta (I like strozzapreti or fusilli)
3 TB butter
1/4-1/2 c. pasta cooking water
1 c. ricotta cheese
3 TB Spring garlic pesto
1/2 c. Parmesan cheese

*In the picture you can tell that I used pancetta in my original recipe. It is very tasty with the pesto, but does take away some of the spotlight on the green garlic so left it out of this recipe. If you would like to add it back in, cook it in the pan before adding the butter and pasta. 


To make the pesto: trim the roots and the toughest top parts of the greens from the green garlic (you should be able to use most of the stem and bulb) and chop roughly. Place in a food processor with the Parmesan cheese, walnuts, salt, pepper, and 1/2 c. extra virgin olive oil. Process until the mixture is blended and just slightly coarse. If it is too thick, add a bit more olive oil and process again. You will want about 3 TB or so for the pasta recipe. The rest you can freeze in ice cube trays and then wrap in a ziplock bag to pull out when needed.

Cook the pasta according to package directions. Before draining, reserve 1 c. of the pasta cooking water. In a large pot (perhaps the pot the pasta was cooked in after it has been drained) heat the butter until melted over medium heat. Add the pasta and toss, then add about 1/4 c. of the pasta cooking water and toss again. The butter and water should start to form a creamy sauce over the pasta. Add the ricotta cheese and about 2-4 TB more of the pasta cooking water and stir a bit more before adding the pesto and the Parmesan cheese. Once coated well and warmed through, the pasta is ready to serve.


Friday, May 9, 2014

Mushroom and Ramp Crepes

Spring conjures images of endless blue skies and warmth, yet in actuality it often brings along rainy, grey days. A peak out the window on one of these mornings reveals a seamless off-white sky, fog hanging around the edges of every building. As I step outdoors on my way to the park for my run the mist immediately coats my skin. Yet there is a warmth hanging in the air, a sense that the rains of spring are bringing me an offering: and then that gift drifts into my nostrils. The scent of green: fresh, new, and bright. Peering through the matte air around an almost empty park, I am enveloped by an emerald city. Shades pale, fluorescent, deep, all mix, mingle, and overwhelm every direction I turn. Seemingly overnight the rain has helped transform the landscape from the barren browns and greys of the long, hard winter, to the sea of new life promising relief.

The wet days also lend their hand in the growth of the season's crops. Ramps and green garlic finally hit the stalls at the greenmarket, leading the way before the onslaught of bounty. I take advantage of their appearance, preparing them simply, an offering of thanks for the rainy days that brought them to me.


Mushroom and Ramp Crepes
crepes: (from Ratio by Ruhlman)
(This will make more crepes than you will have filling for. You could always make more ramp filling, but I like to add a little sugar to the batter towards the end and use the rest for dessert.)
1 c. milk
4 large eggs
1 c. flour
pinch of salt

Mix together all of the ingredients, creating a smooth batter. Cover and rest in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes.
Heat a 6-8" skillet over medium heat. Give the pan a quick brush with a bit of butter or oil. Pour in just enough batter to coat the bottom of the pan after you have given it a bit of a swirl. Cook until set, about 30-40 seconds, and then flip. Cook the other side for about 20 seconds or so and then remove to a platter. Continue with remaining batter.

filling:
2 TB olive oil
1/2 lb. oyster mushrooms, chopped
1/4 lb. ramps, divided into whites and greens and chopped

Heat a saute pan over medium-high heat. Add the oil and once hot toss in the oyster mushrooms. Cook for a few moments then add in the chopped white parts of the ramps. Continue to saute until the mushrooms are browned all over, then add the chopped green parts of the ramps and toss together. Remove from the heat.


tarragon sauce:
4 TB butter
2 TB flour
1 c. heavy cream
1 TB fresh tarragon, chopped
1/4 t. salt
1/8 t. pepper

In a small saucepan heat the butter over medium heat until melted. Whisk in the flour, stirring for about 1-2 minutes. Pour in the heaving cream while continuing to whisk. After a few minutes the sauce should begin to thicken. Add the tarragon, salt, and pepper. Taste and adjust seasonings accordingly.

To serve:
Fill a crepe with a few tablespoons of the mushrooms and ramp filling. Roll up and then drizzle with the tarragon sauce. Serve immediately.

serves 2